WHAT IS A DEXA SCAN

A DEXA Scan, also called a bone density scan, uses dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. The x-rays pass through your bones and what is not absorbed is detected on the other side of the body. This allows doctors to determine the density of your bones. In turn it can help doctors diagnose osteoporosis and other conditions.

HOW DOES IT WORK

The scan lasts about five minutes and you will be able to go home after you’re done.

In most cases you will not have to wear a gown and can lie down on the scanner in your street clothes. The scanner is open, so you won’t feel claustrophobic. Once your body has been scanned, you’re good to go!

The scan is painless and noninvasive. One of our doctors will follow-up with you about your test results.

WHY DEXA

“A woman’s risk of fracture is equal to her combined risk of breast, uterine, and ovarian cancer.” - National Osteoporosis Foundation

According to the National Osteoporosis Foundation, 50% of women and 25% of men over the age of 50 will break a bone as a result of Osteoporosis. Unfortunately, many are not diagnosed with Osteoporosis until after they break a bone. In fact, 80% of older Americans who have had a fracture are not treated or tested for Osteoporosis.

The DEXA scan is the only scan that can diagnose Osteoporosis before a fracture occurs. Treatment can prevent about half of the fractures caused by Osteoporosis. A DEXA Scan gives you the knowledge to own your health.

WHO SHOULD HAVE THIS SCAN

According to the National Osteoporosis Foundation, you should have a bone density test if you meet any of the following criteria.

You are a woman age 65 or older.
You are a man age 70 or older.
You break a bone after age 50.
You are a woman of menopausal age with risk factors.
You are a postmenopausal woman under age 65 with risk factors.
You are a man age between the ages of 50 and 69 with risk factors.

Your doctor might also recommend a DEXA Scan if you experience any of the following:

An x-ray of your spine shows a break or bone loss.
You have back pain with a possible break in your spine.