We can all agree that white, refined sugar is harmful. Even though it may taste great, it has zero nutritional benefits. But, there is controversy in the holistic health industry over some forms of sugar. Honey is one of those controversial sugars. Like refined cane sugar, it causes a blood sugar spike and will cause weight gain if too much is eaten at one time.

According to Dr. Oz, the average person consumes 150 pounds of sugar a year. That is almost 3 pounds a week! No one is eating sugar by the spoonful, but if we were to measure the amount of sugar we (and our children) eat through processed foods every day, we would be shocked.

But here is why I love honey. First of all, it’s rarely found in processed foods, so we can be more mindful about when and how much honey we eat. Of course, read all nutritional labels, and not only for the amount of sugar present, but also the ingredients. Just because a seemingly healthy snack contains honey, we don’t want to fall into the same trap of overdosing on sugar—even in the form of honey. Although, there are many benefits to eating honey*.

Enjoy while consuming in moderation!

*I must make an important note here – according the American Association of Pediatrics, you should never give a child younger than 1 year any honey, because it could contain a bacterium that causes infant botulism.  

1. Orange Popsicles

Ingredients

  • 1 envelope (1 Tbsp) of plain gelatin (I prefer to use organic beef gelatin)
  • ½ cup cold water
  • 2 ½ cup boiling water
  • 2 Tbsp. sugar
  • 1 cup concentrated orange juice

Directions

  • Pour the cold water into a large glass mixing bowl.  Sprinkle gelatin over the cold water and allow it to stand 5 minutes, or until soft.
  • Add boiling water and stir until gelatin is completely dissolved.
  • Add sugar and orange juice.
  • Pour into molds or ice cube trays.

Look at the following vitamins and minerals we give our bodies when we eat honey:

B6 – protects and strengthens the immune system
Thiamin (B1) – is essential for the breakdown of fat and protein
Niacin (B3) – helps to balance cholesterol levels and triglycerides
Riboflavin (B2) – plays a major role in energy production
Pantothenic Acid (B5) – helps alleviate conditions like asthma, allergies, stress and anxiety
Amino Acids – helps to build muscle
Calcium – builds and maintains strong bones
Copper – helps with the formation of collagen and increases the absorption of iron
Iron – helps metabolize proteins as well as production of hemoglobin and red blood cells
Magnesium – Helps with energy, calms anxiety, relieves constipation and muscle spasms
Manganese – benefits healthy bone structure, bone metabolism, and building bones
Phosphorus – a vital part of the growth process, as well as the health of bones and teeth
Potassium – good for blood pressure, electrolytic functions, and nervous system
Sodium – plays a pivotal role in enzyme operations and muscle contraction
Zinc – essential for regulating the immune system

Recipe adapted from Joy with Honey by Doris Mech, published in 1979.

2. Peanut Butter Crunchies

Ingredients

  • 1 cup honey
  • ¾ cup peanut butter (or any other nut butter)
  • 5 cups Crispy Rice Cereal
  • 1 cup sunflower seeds
  • Butter for pan

Directions

  • In a large, heavy saucepan, heat the honey and the peanut butter, stirring constantly until well blended.
  • Add cereal and sunflower seeds, mixing thoroughly.
  • Press into a well buttered 9” X 13” pan.  Cool and cut into squares.

Look at the following vitamins and minerals we give our bodies when we eat honey:

B6 – protects and strengthens the immune system
Thiamin (B1) – is essential for the breakdown of fat and protein
Niacin (B3) – helps to balance cholesterol levels and triglycerides
Riboflavin (B2) – plays a major role in energy production
Pantothenic Acid (B5) – helps alleviate conditions like asthma, allergies, stress and anxiety
Amino Acids – helps to build muscle
Calcium – builds and maintains strong bones
Copper – helps with the formation of collagen and increases the absorption of iron
Iron – helps metabolize proteins as well as production of hemoglobin and red blood cells
Magnesium – Helps with energy, calms anxiety, relieves constipation and muscle spasms
Manganese – benefits healthy bone structure, bone metabolism, and building bones
Phosphorus – a vital part of the growth process, as well as the health of bones and teeth
Potassium – good for blood pressure, electrolytic functions, and nervous system
Sodium – plays a pivotal role in enzyme operations and muscle contraction
Zinc – essential for regulating the immune system

Recipe adapted from Joy with Honey by Doris Mech, published in 1979.

3. Chocolate Rounds


Ingredients

  • ¼ cup honey
  • ½ cup peanut butter (or another nut butter)
  • ½ cut chopped peanuts (can also use sunflower seeds for those with peanut allergies)
  • ½ cup coconut
  • ¼ cup cocoa (can also use carob powder)
  • ¼ cut dry powdered milk

Directions

  • Mix and knead all ingredients.
  • Roll into small balls.
  • Chill in the fridge. Yummy!

Look at the following vitamins and minerals we give our bodies when we eat honey:

B6 – protects and strengthens the immune system
Thiamin (B1) – is essential for the breakdown of fat and protein
Niacin (B3) – helps to balance cholesterol levels and triglycerides
Riboflavin (B2) – plays a major role in energy production
Pantothenic Acid (B5) – helps alleviate conditions like asthma, allergies, stress and anxiety
Amino Acids – helps to build muscle
Calcium – builds and maintains strong bones
Copper – helps with the formation of collagen and increases the absorption of iron
Iron – helps metabolize proteins as well as production of hemoglobin and red blood cells
Magnesium – Helps with energy, calms anxiety, relieves constipation and muscle spasms
Manganese – benefits healthy bone structure, bone metabolism, and building bones
Phosphorus – a vital part of the growth process, as well as the health of bones and teeth
Potassium – good for blood pressure, electrolytic functions, and nervous system
Sodium – plays a pivotal role in enzyme operations and muscle contraction
Zinc – essential for regulating the immune system

Recipe adapted from Joy with Honey by Doris Mech, published in 1979.

4. Peanut Butter-Sesame Balls


Ingredients

  • ¾ cup peanut butter (or other nut butter)
  • ½ cup honey
  • ¾ cup powdered milk
  • 1 cup rolled oats
  • ¾ cup sesame seeds, toasted
  • ½ cup sesame seeds, toasted (set these aside for later in the recipe)
  • 1 tsp. vanilla
  • 1 Tbsp. boiling water

Directions

  • Toast all of the sesame seeds in a dry skillet over medium heat.  Stir frequently, to prevent burning.
  • Stir together peanut butter and honey.  Then add powdered milk and stir to combine.  Next add rolled oats, ¾ cups sesame seeds, boiling water, and vanilla.  Mix thoroughly.
  • Shape into small balls and roll in remaining ½ cup sesame seeds generously.
  • Refrigerate until firmly set.

Look at the following vitamins and minerals we give our bodies when we eat honey:

B6 – protects and strengthens the immune system
Thiamin (B1) – is essential for the breakdown of fat and protein
Niacin (B3) – helps to balance cholesterol levels and triglycerides
Riboflavin (B2) – plays a major role in energy production
Pantothenic Acid (B5) – helps alleviate conditions like asthma, allergies, stress and anxiety
Amino Acids – helps to build muscle
Calcium – builds and maintains strong bones
Copper – helps with the formation of collagen and increases the absorption of iron
Iron – helps metabolize proteins as well as production of hemoglobin and red blood cells
Magnesium – Helps with energy, calms anxiety, relieves constipation and muscle spasms
Manganese – benefits healthy bone structure, bone metabolism, and building bones
Phosphorus – a vital part of the growth process, as well as the health of bones and teeth
Potassium – good for blood pressure, electrolytic functions, and nervous system
Sodium – plays a pivotal role in enzyme operations and muscle contraction
Zinc – essential for regulating the immune system

Recipe adapted from Joy with Honey by Doris Mech, published in 1979.

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